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Tel: (212) 742-8000
Tel: (212) 785-9620
Tel: (718) 626-6666

Patellofemoral Injuries

Patellofemoral pain syndrome is the pain in the front of the knee. It frequently occurs in teenagers, manual laborers, and athletes. It sometimes is caused by wearing down, roughening, or softening of the cartilage under the kneecap. It is also known as “runner’s knee”. It is a generic term that is used to describe pain at the front portion of the knee. Its symptoms keep increasing over a period of time.

Causes

Patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by overuse, injury, excess weight, a kneecap that is not properly aligned or changes under the kneecap.

Symptoms

The main symptom of patellofemoral pain syndrome is knee pain, especially when sitting with bent knees, squatting, jumping, or using the stairs. You may also experience occasional knee buckling, in which the knee suddenly and unexpectedly gives way and does not support your body weight. A catching, popping, or grinding sensation when walking or with knee movement is also common.

Treatment

Patellofemoral pain syndrome can be relieved by avoiding activities that make symptoms worse.

Avoid sitting or kneeling in the bent-knee position for long periods of time.

Adjust a bicycle or exercise bike so that the resistance is not too great and the seat is at an appropriate height. The rider should be able to spin the pedals of an exercise bike without shifting weight from side to side, and the legs should not be fully extended at the lowest part of the pedal stroke. Avoid bent-knee exercises, such as squats, deep knee bends, or 90-degree leg extensions.

Medications to minimize pain like NSAID’s are prescribed in the event of severe pain.

Physical therapy exercises

Exercises may include stretching to increase flexibility and decrease tightness around the knee, and straight-leg raises and other exercises to strengthen the quadriceps muscle. Taping or using a brace to stabilize the kneecap.

Home Patellofemoral Injuries

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Locations

Wall Street Office.
30 Wall St., Suite 500
Tel: (212) 742-8000

Upper East Side.
232 E. 66th St.
Tel: (212) 785-9620

Astoria Office.
29-15 Astoria Blvd
Tel: (718) 626-6666

Our address

1

30 Wall St., Suite 500,New York, NY 10005

Tel: (212) 742-8000, Mail: web@optimumrehabnyc.com
2

232 E. 66th St.,New York, NY 10065

Tel: (212) 785-9620, Mail: web@optimumrehabnyc.com

3

29-15 Astoria Blvd, Astoria, NY 11102

Tel: (718) 626-6666, Mail: web@optimumrehabnyc.com